Winners

AGRICULTURE PHOTO OF THE YEAR

"BETWEEN HERONS AND FARMING"

ERWIN MASCARIñAS

Sun Star Cagayan de Oro

TOBACCO PHOTO OF THE YEAR

"A FARMER"

BERWIN BELEO

Tempo

 

 

AGRICULTURE STORY OF THE YEAR
“Aging Farmers”
JUJEMAY AWIT
Sun Star Cebu

 

This two-part series talks about how farmers in the Philippines are getting older and older each year while the younger generation is turning its back on this industry and how the Department of Agriculture, Department of Education and local schools are making the effort to make farming a viable, profitable and sustainable option for young Filipinos. 

 

FULL STORY

TOBACCO STORY OF THE YEAR
“SO WHAT IS HOLDING UP THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF TOBACCO BY PRODUCTS”
IAN OCAMPO FLORA
Sun Star Pampanga

 

This article discusses the various by-products that can be derived from tobacco. The tobacco stalk is a good source of pulp for paper. Tobacco scrap can be used as an effective pesticide. Tobacco dust can be used in aquaculture. These by-products can provide additional income not only to the farmers but could also create new and profitable industries. The National Tobacco Administration and several private entities have already done extensive research on these by-products but still need additional support from the government and investment from the private sector.

 

FULL STORY

BEST AGRICULTURE TV PROGRAM OR SEGMENT
“AGRI TAYO DITO - GOVERNOR GENEROSO”
KARREN VERONA, PRODUCER
ABS-CBN Davao

 

This episode visits the town of Governor Generoso in Davao Oriental and explores the rich natural wonders and the agriculture stories from the forests, farms and fisheries of this town in the southernmost tip of Mindanao.  

 

FULL STORY

 

BEST AGRICULTURE RADIO PROGRAM OR SEGMENT
“AGRI TAYO PIDDIG”
ARIEL TEJADA
DWCI FM
 

Agriculture Secretary Manny Piñol has ordered the updating of soil analysis data nationwide.  Though this is best done in a laboratory, it is expensive and, due to limited number of labs with such capability, also difficult.  This episode discusses the various methods that farmers can test the soil themselves using materials that can be easily found at home. 

 

FULL STORY

 

BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY NATIONAL
“ILOCOS DRAGON FRUIT BRINGS CURE AND INCOME TO MANY”
FREDDIE LAZARO
The Manila Bulletin

 

The article explains how the conversion of idle lots into dragon fruit plantations has made Ilocos Norte the dragon fruit capital of the Philippines.  Dragon fruit is a zero waste fruit that contains high level of anti-oxidants and Vitamin C that can help prevent the formation of cancer cells, regulate blood sugar levels and lower cholesterol.  

 

FULL STORY

 

 

BEST AGRICULTURE NEWS STORY REGIONAL
“SAVING BENGUET’S VEGETABLE INDUSTRY”
KARLSTON LAPNITEN
Baguio Chronicle

 

 

Benguet, long known for being the “Salad Bowl of the Philippines” is in danger of losing that title because the local vegetable farmers have been resistant to adopting modern farming technologies and interventions.  The local farmer’s heavy use of chemicals and other types of fertilizers have caused the soil to become acidic and are making it more difficult to produce good quantity yield.  Through the efforts of local agencies and the learning of young Benguet farmers sent to Japan for training, the province is now hopeful that there may be solutions for the local agriculture industry. 

 

FULL STORY

 

BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY NATIONAL
OPEN AIR MUSEUM IN IFUGAO"
RIZALDY COMANDA
Manila Bulletin

 

A story about the Open Air Museum at the Nagacadan Rice Terraces in Kiangan, Ifugao.  The musuem has made tourism the town’s second main source of income, next to agriculture.  The museum is considered a “living cultural landscape” where the local community can continue the traditional culture of growing the Tinawon rice variety.  

 

FULL STORY

 

BEST AGRICULTURE FEATURE STORY REGIONAL
“LIVES AND TERRACES INTERTWINED”
MARY GRACE NIDOY
PhilRice Magazine

 

This is the story of the Bukidnon Iraynons, a community of indigenous people from Panay Island in Western Visayas. The Iraynons have spent the past 200 years protecting the rice terraces built by their ancestors.  Through the tribe’s diligence and hard work, the Antique terraces has thrived and has not only provided food for the community but also their primary source of livelihood.   

 

FULL STORY